Thursday, July 2

Lyme Disease

Lyme disease, coronavirus, EEE to create ‘perfect storm’ this summer – Boston Herald

Lyme disease, coronavirus, EEE to create ‘perfect storm’ this summer – Boston Herald

The ongoing threat of coronavirus coupled with the risk of EEE and Lyme disease that often increases in the summer months will create “the perfect storm” for illness as people spend more time outside due to the pandemic. “We are not just in a COVID pandemic but we are also in a Lyme disease endemic,” said Eva Sapi, director of the Lyme disease program at the University of New Haven. Sapi said Lyme disease could be worse than normal this summer because of the mild winter we experienced in New England: “That’s usually a bad sign of Lyme disease because those ticks didn’t freeze.” Many symptoms of Lyme disease such as fever, cough and weakness overlap with coronavirus, Sapi said, adding that if anyone experiences such symptoms they should be tested not only for coronavirus, but for Lyme dise...

Sponsored Content Lyme Disease – WBNG-TV

(WBNG) -- According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. New York State is one of the 16 states that has a high incidence of Lyme Disease. Excellus Blue Cross Blue Shield’s Medical Director Dr. Nicholas Massa tells us more about this serious illness and how to prevent it.
Lyme disease now, EEE could soon follow – Boston 25 News

Lyme disease now, EEE could soon follow – Boston 25 News

“We seen and have gotten a lot of calls from people in the community about bullseye rashes,” said Christina Hermos, MD, a pediatric infectious disease doctor with UMass Memorial. “Lyme disease appropriately treated, the vast majority of the time, is cured.”
Is it Lyme disease or COVID-19? – WFMYNews2.com

Is it Lyme disease or COVID-19? – WFMYNews2.com

Health experts warn the two share similar symptoms. GREENSBORO, N.C. — Coronavirus is not the only thing you have to worry about this summer.  Ticks are back in full force which means the potential to contract Lyme disease. Melanie Martin with Any Lab Test Now in Greensboro said folks need to be careful while spending time outdoors. Some ticks in our area can carry Lyme disease, an infection that affects brain and nervous system, muscles and joints, and the heart. "So what will happen is they can actually bite you and they can transmit the Lyme disease that way," Martin said Martin said it's important to know it's symptoms especially this year. "Fever, chills. It can kind of feel like you may be getting the flu or potentially have other symptoms that are related to COVID...
Expert: ‘It’s scary’ how coronavirus and Lyme pose similar symptoms – CTPost

Expert: ‘It’s scary’ how coronavirus and Lyme pose similar symptoms – CTPost

This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a blacklegged tick, also known as a deer tick, a carrier of Lyme disease. Experts said Lyme disease carries many of the same symptoms as COVID-19. less This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a blacklegged tick, also known as a deer tick, a carrier of Lyme disease. Experts said Lyme disease carries many of ... more Photo: James Gathany / Associated Press Photo: James Gathany / Associated Press Image 1 of / 3 Caption Close Image 1 of 3 This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a blacklegged tick, also known as a deer tick, a carrier of Lyme disease. Experts said L...
What happens when coronavirus and Lyme disease intersect? It’s a scary time for patients – USA TODAY

What happens when coronavirus and Lyme disease intersect? It’s a scary time for patients – USA TODAY

In mid-March, shortly after coronavirus quarantine rules went into effect in New York, sportscaster and former professional tennis player Patrick McEnroe went out for a run in a local park. An itch on his upper-arm a day later revealed an embedded tick, which he promptly removed. After urging from his wife, he sent the tick to a lab to test if it was infected with Lyme. Normally energetic, McEnroe soon became lethargic and short of breath; he had trouble sleeping and, in the hours he did, his dreams were uncharacteristically bizarre. When his fever hit 100 degrees for two consecutive days, he was tested for COVID-19. His tick test returned positive for Lyme. The next day, his COVID-19 test came back positive, too. This scenario points to a looming crisis. What happens whe...
DOH warns that Lyme disease shares symptoms with COVID-19 – Pocono Record

DOH warns that Lyme disease shares symptoms with COVID-19 – Pocono Record

As more and more Pennsylvanians escape from their domiciles to explore the great outdoors again, the Department of Health is advising nature lovers in the commonwealth to take precautions against ticks. On Tuesday, Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine offered up some advice to outdoorsmen and women on the proper steps to prevent problems with ticks and Lyme disease, which can present symptoms similar to COVID-19. "Over the past several months, we have seen an increase in the number of emergency department visits related to tick bites," Levine said. "Some symptoms of Lyme disease, such as fever, chills and headache, are similar to symptoms of COVID-19. It is essential that all residents know the proper ways to protect themselves against ticks and are aware of the dangerous diseases they c...
Lyme disease can mimic symptoms of COVID-19, health officials warn – Ellwood City Ledger

Lyme disease can mimic symptoms of COVID-19, health officials warn – Ellwood City Ledger

Fever, chills, headache need to be diagnosed to avoid serious complications. Pennsylvania is seeing an uptick in emergency visits for tick bites as more people are taking to outdoor recreational activities, including hikes, while social distancing. State Secretary of Health Rachel Levine reminded residents to take proper steps to prevent tick bites that can lead to Lyme disease, which has symptoms similar to COVID-19. "Over the past several months, we have seen an increase in the number of emergency department visits related to tick bites," Levine said. "Some symptoms of Lyme disease, such as fever, chills and headache, are similar to symptoms of COVID-19. It is essential that all residents know the proper ways to protect themselves against ticks and are aware of the dangerous diseases th...
Area students win Lyme Disease Awareness Month poster contest – Lewiston Sun Journal

Area students win Lyme Disease Awareness Month poster contest – Lewiston Sun Journal

AUGUSTA — The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention (Maine CDC) has announced the winners of the 2020 Lyme Disease Awareness Month poster contest. As part of observing Lyme Disease Awareness Month every May, Maine CDC holds a poster contest for Maine students in kindergarten through eighth grade to highlight the importance of awareness and prevention of diseases caused by ticks. This year, students designed posters on the theme “Tick Tock,” which reminds Mainers to slow down and take time to practice tick and tick-borne disease prevention. Students illustrated at least one specific preventive method on the poster, such as using an EPA-approved repellent, wearing protective clothing, performing daily tick checks and using caution in tick-infested areas. Maine CDC select...
Can you contract Lyme disease in Nebraska? – Beatrice Daily Sun

Can you contract Lyme disease in Nebraska? – Beatrice Daily Sun

Return to homepage × You have run out of free articles. You can support our newsroom by joining at our lowest rate! Already a subscriber? Loading&hellp; No thanks, return to homepage. × Sign Up Today and Support Local Journalism Enjoy more articles from Beatrice's Most Trusted Information Source. Subscribers can log in for unlimited digital access {{featured_button_text}} One of the first indications of Lyme disease infection is the development of a bulls eye rash at the bite site. This is the rash that developed on a friend’s arm a few days after he removed a tick. He assumes the tick got on him while cutting firewood. Lyme disease is definitely here in Nebraska. I talked about ticks and tick borne diseases earlier this spri...